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BreastSentry is a sophisticated blood test that measures the levels of two bio-markers, proneurotensin (pro-NT) and proenkephalin (pro-ENK), which are highly predictive of a woman’s risk for developing breast cancer. Longitudinal clinical studies have shown that elevated levels of pro-NT and decreased levels of pro-ENK are strong, independent risk factors for the development of breast cancer. 17-31

  • BreastSentry is simple & convenient and can be done at your annual exam
  • BreastSentry can be used to help healthcare professionals determine a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer.
  • BreastSentry is especially suited for the approximate 50% of women who have dense breasts. Elevated risk scores can help physicians determine if further screening with 3D Tomography, Screening Breast Ultrasound and/or MRI are necessary.

If you are a patient interested in learning more about the BreastSentry test, download our brochure to take to your physician.

I am interested in learning more about the BreastSentry™ test

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Why Get Tested?

The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates that approximately 40,000 women will die from breast cancer in 2017 in the U.S. 7The ACS estimates that Approximately 252,000 cases of invasive breast cancer and 63,000 cases of non-invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in 2017. 7 The National Cancer Institute (NCI) projects that 12.3% (1 in 8) of women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point during their lifetimes. 8An estimated three million women are alive in the U.S. today after being diagnosed with breast cancer. The median age for diagnosing breast cancer is 62 years of age in the U.S., but over one in three cases are diagnosed in women under age 55. 8

Women with Dense Breasts Are at Greater Risk

Two thirds of pre-menopausal and one quarter of post menopausal women have dense breast tissue, which makes it challenging to detect breast cancer by mammography alone. 6 High breast density, as seen on a mammogram, is linked to an increased risk of breast cancer. Women with heterogeneously (40%) and extremely dense breast (10%) tissue very dense breasts are four to five times more likely to develop breast cancer than women with low breast density. 4,5

The American Cancer Society suggests women with dense breasts talk to their health care providers about whether they should consider adding MRI and Ultrasound to their annual mammography screening.10

Take Action

STEP 1 – Get Tested

The BreastSentry™ blood test can be ordered to provide your physician with an additional tool to assess and help manage your risk of having breast cancer. Elevated risk scores can help physicians determine if further screening with 3D Tomography, Screening Breast Ultrasound and/or MRI are necessary.

The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Guidelines and the American Cancer Society (ACS) Guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer include: Yearly mammograms starting at age 40 and continuing for as long as a woman is in good health. 13

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Guidelines are being revised but currently include:

  • The use of screening mammography for breast cancer every two years in women ages 50 to 74. 14
  • Biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be made on an individual basis taking patient context into account. (14)
  • The American Cancer Society suggests women with dense breasts talk to their health care providers about whether they should consider adding MRI and Ultrasound to their annual mammography screening.10

STEP 2 – Understand Your Results

Arrange an appointment to discuss your results and risk score with your medical practitioner. Together you and your doctor can determine if you should have further screenings.

STEP 3 – Follow Your Doctor’s Plan

Breast cancer caught in its early stages can be beaten. It is critical that you follow your medical provider’s advice, which may include the need for adding MRI and Ultrasound to your annual mammography screening.


Breast Cancer Risk Factors

The following are considered breast cancer risk factors 15

  • Age: Incidence doubles every 10 years until menopause, when the rate of increase slows.
  • Genetic mutations (e.g.,BRCA1, BRCA2).
  • Age at menopause: Women who start menstruating early in life or who have a late menopause have an increased risk.
  • Smoking: Women who start smoking before their first menstrual cycles have a
    61% higher risk than those who never smoked.
  • Race and ethnicity: White women are slightly more at risk than African-American
    women.
  • Dense breast tissue: Women with dense breasts have a risk 1.2 to 2 times greater.
  • Hormone replacement therapy (HRT): The relative risk of breast cancer increases by about 2% for each year of HRT.
  • Obesity: Overweight women have a twofold increased risk in postmenopausal women.
  • Alcohol: Women who have two to five drinks daily have about 1.5 times the risk of
    women who don’t drink

Signs and Symptoms

The following signs and symptoms of Breast Cancer11

  • A breast lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area
  • Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast
  • Change in the size, shape or appearance of a breast
  • Dimpling or puckering of the skin over the breast
  • Peeling, scaling or flaking of the pigmented area of skin surrounding the nipple
  • Pulling in (inversion) of the nipple or other parts of the breast
  • Nipple discharge that starts suddenly or is bloody
  • New pain in one spot that does not go away


Billing

For any billing or other payment questions, please contact our office at 1-855-420-7140 and simply select "Billing" when prompted.

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